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View of Georgetown campus from the Virginia side of the Potomac

View of Georgetown campus from the Virginia side of the Potomac

Images

Cite your sources

Whether media is in the Public Domain, open access, commercially licensed or self-produced, you must give an indication of its source in order to use it in an academic context.

Citation is a matter of academic integrity, and applies to text as well as media.

  • Please refer to the What is Plagiarism from the Undergraduate Honor Council's and the Graduate School's information on Academic Integrity.
  • Consider using a citation manager to keep track of the images you use. The library supports Refworks.

 

Citing Images in Chicago/Turabian Style

In general, your citation should include information about both the image and the source of the image. When elements of the description are missing, provide enough information so that the image can be traced to its source. You may leave out the author name if none is provided. If no title for the image is provided, create a descriptive title framed in quotes.

If the image is your own, you could cite it as unpublished resource. On the other hand, you could also post it online (with the appropriate Creative Commons license, of course), and cite from the resulting page.

Citing Images in Turabian

From a print source:

  • Artist’s name (first then last), title of the artwork (italicize titles of paintings and sculptures but set all other titles in quotation marks), creation date, repository name (including city and state).
  • If the artwork appears in a published source (book, magazine, etc.), give the publication information in place of the repository or location. Include the page number.
Example:

Georgia O’Keeffe, The Cliff Chimneys,1938, in Barbara Buhler Lyens, Georgia O’Keeffe and New Mexico: A Sense of Place (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004), 25.

From a digital (Internet) source:

    • Artist’s name (first then last), the title of the artwork (italicize titles of paintings and sculptures but set all other titles in quotation marks), creation date, repository name (including city and state). Title of the online site, format type, URL, access date (in parentheses).
      Example

      Mark Rothko, Orange and Red on Red, 1957, The Phillips Collection, Washington DC. Artstor, database, JPG, www.artstor.org. (accessed September 20, 2013).

      Citation & style guides

      These works provide detailed information on citation styles. See the examples below.

      Creative Commons   This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial 4.0 International License. | Details of our policy