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View of Georgetown campus from the Virginia side of the Potomac

View of Georgetown campus from the Virginia side of the Potomac

Georgetown University Timeline

A timeline of significant events in the history of Georgetown University

2000-2009

 

 View from Lauinger on 9/11  View from Lauinger, 9/11/2001

 

2000

 

University and  MedStar agree to the sale of the Hospital in February 25

First issue of The Fire This Time, a newspaper for African-American students and students of color, is produced on April 5. This publication, the name of which is inspired by James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, starts after two hate attacks against students of color and becomes an expression of activism and dialogue

Nursing School changes its name to School of Nursing & Health Studies (NHS)

 

2001

 

Students and faculty submit petitions supporting the creation of an African American Studies program with over a thousand signatures 

John J. DeGioia becomes president on July 1

Main Campus closes at noon on September 11 after the terrorist attacks but classes are held on September 12. On September 14, proclaimed a National Day of Prayer, classes end at noon and the Healy Hall bell tower tolls from 12 to 12:05 p.m., signaling moments of silence and reflection.  Students gather on Copley lawn to create and hang banners in tribute to the victims. These join yellow ribbons at the entrances to campus buildings and American flags hanging from dorm windows

Madeleine Albright returns to the faculty after serving as Secretary of State

 

2002

 

Statue of Jan Karski is unveiled; the Polish Foreign Minister attends the ceremony. The memorial is a life-size sculpture of the professor sitting on a bench playing chess, his favorite game. It is located on the lawn beside White-Gravenor

$12 million renovation of St. Mary’s Hall is completed

Samuel Halsey, the first African American to earn an undergraduate degree, receives the President’s Medal from University President John J. DeGioia in recognition of a lifetime of achievement

 

2003

 

Midnight Mug opens on the second floor of the Lauinger Library in January

Episode from season four of the West Wing tv show is filmed on campus in April 2003. In the episode which airs on May 7, West Wing President Josiah Bartlett (played by Martin Sheen) speaks at the Georgetown graduation of his daughter Zoey Bartlett (played by Elizabeth Moss) 

Southwest Quad, including Leo’s, opens

Georgetown Women’s Leadership Institute is founded

 

2004

 

John Thompson III becomes head men’s basketball coach at Georgetown; he and his father join 18 other sets of fathers and sons who have both coached at the collegiate level

 

2005

 

Foreign Service School’s Qatar campus opens, overseen by founding Dean James Reardon-Anderson

Reena Aggarwal is named interim Dean of the McDonough Business School

MBA evening program is launched

Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, visits campus for a seminar on faith and social responsibility on November 3

 

2006

 

Sugar’s (a diner at 35th and O Streets, NW) closes. It had opened as a drugstore in 1917 

Kofi Annan, Secretary General of the United Nations speaks in Gaston Hall on October 30

Rosemary Kilkenny is appointed to the newly created position of Vice President for Institutional Diversity and Equity

 

2007

 

Department of Performing Arts is created

Guild of Bands (GOB), an academic music ensemble, is established as part of the new undergraduate degree in American Musical Culture.  It is designed as a training laboratory for aspiring musicians and songwriters

 

2008

 

Global Executive MBA program is launched

 

2009

 

Georgetown Entrepreneurship Initiative is founded

Rafik B. Hariri Building is dedicated on September 16

 

 

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